seanhowe:

The Man Who Colored The Marvel Universe:

Stan Goldberg (1932-2014)

Marvel colorist Stan Goldberg, who created the color schemes of the costumes of Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, and dozens of others, died yesterday, at the age of 82. Mark Evanier has more information here.


I wrote briefly, in Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, about two of Stan’s contributions to the Marvel mythos.

On The Fantastic Four:

And although they remained unmasked (in another break from comic-book convention, they were going to keep their identities public), at the urging of letter-writing fans they soon had snappy blue uniforms. “Jack gave them this long underwear with the letter ‘4’ on their chest,” said Stan Goldberg, who designed the color schemes of the Marvel comics. “I made the ‘4’ blue and kept a little area around it white, and then when the villains came in—the villains get the burnt umbers, dark greens, purples, grays, things like that—they can bounce off it.” The blast of colorful heroics against a murky background world immediately set Fantastic Four apart from everything else on the newsstand.

On Spider-Man:

The grand melodrama was offset by Lee’s snappy patter, Ditko’s stunning costume design, and, once again, the primary-color palette choices of Stan Goldberg, who selected for Spider-Man’s costume a combination of cherry red and dark cobalt (in deliberate contrast to the more vivacious azure of the Fantastic Four).

____

Goldberg also drew non-superhero comics for Marvel in its Timely incarnation, and was the longtime artist for Marvel’s Millie the Model series. In the late 1960s he began drawing for various series published by Archie Comics.

cryptofwrestling:

Hot-Chu vending machine card(1970s)

cryptofwrestling:

Hot-Chu vending machine card
(1970s)

noahvansciver:

Sketchbook page.

noahvansciver:

Sketchbook page.

fileformat:

epiphany

(via laurennmcc)

Tags: madon

arecomicsevengood:

Gary Panter, 1978. Taken from this interview.

arecomicsevengood:

Gary Panter, 1978. Taken from this interview.

chancepress:

Here are some detail photos of the hardcover special edition of A Deitch Miscellany. We added this small edition (15 copies) a few days into the Kickstarter funding period, since the paperback edition sold out right away. As of now, there’s one copy left, and we’ll have it for sale at SPX.

Inside each cover is a suite of prints, including fine art inkjet prints of Kim’s Sex! Drugs! and Sweet Music! story originally published in Kramers Ergot 7. The guts of the book are comprised of a fold-out triptych with the same story in color and black and white as well as a 52-page selection of Kim’s pencil studies.

The front cover plate and title page plate are letterpress printed, and each copy is signed by the artist.

"

Squirrel Girl was created by writer Will Murray and artist Steve Ditko, making her debut in “The Coming of … Squirrel Girl” in Marvel Super-Heroes vol. 2, #8, a.k.a. Marvel Super-Heroes Winter Special (cover-dated Jan. 1992).[2] She ambushes the superhero Iron Man, teams up with him, and, after Iron Man is captured, defeats the villainous Doctor Doom. The story also introduces her squirrel sidekick, Monkey Joe.

Murray has since described the character’s genesis;

'Actually I created Squirrel Girl in script form without any artist input. Tom Morgan was originally going to draw it, but when he dropped out, I requested Ditko and got him. Ditko did a great job in bringing my baby to life. He invented that knuckle spike. It wasn’t in the script. I based Squirrel Girl ironically enough on a long–ago girlfriend who read comics and was into “critters”—wild animals of all types. Coincidentally, she was big Ditko fan. '

"

Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squirrel_Girl#Creation_and_development

"Bill [Hall] already had interesting Ditko connections at that point. A quasi-friendship with editor Cat Yronwode led him to hear of Cat’s assertion Ditko had assisted Eric Stanton on his works back in the late ’50s/early ’60s. The two had an explosive falling out when Cat accused Bill of stealing her checklist, and Bill printed her letter in Ditkomania! Cat bad-mouthed Bill in Eclipse Comics editorials, but given her track record of truth concerning the aborted (thanks to her efforts to go behind Ditko’s back and interview his brother and class-mates, as opposed to the ludicrous "company flood" story) THE ART OF STEVE DITKO, one is inclined to side with Bill on this score."

Blake Bell, Ditko Looked Up

http://www.oocities.org/soho/museum/7437/ditko/artist/ardmani1.html

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Jeet Heer on Jack Kirby

1. Since everyone is gathered together at SDCC, a twitter-essay on what we owe Jack Kirby.
2. Globally, the two biggest shapers of the imagination of late 20th and early 21st childhood are Walt Disney and Jack Kirby
3. For better or worse, Disney and Kirby divide up the gender of childhood: the Disney princess, the Kirby superhero.
4. The superhero genre of course pre-dates Kirby, although not by much, but no one did more to fertilize and invigorate the concept.
4. Kirby constantly took pre-existing genre material and gave it an ideological edge or affective power previously lacking.
5. Example: Superman already had Popular Front subtext but Kirby co-created explicitly ideological anti-Nazi superhero with Captain America
6. The pre-existing superhero was all about sensation, wish-fulfillment, wonder: Kirby added the essential ingredient of affect.
7. Affect meaning not just emotion but we can call bodily knowledge, the scars of particular experience, made evident by Kirby’s drawings.
8. The superhero revival of the 1970s is almost entirely product of Kirby bringing to genre the brunt of life experience previously lacking
9. What happened to Kirby between Captain American (1941) and the 1960s (Fantastic Four, Hulk, Thor, Black Panther, etc.)?
10. What happened was: World War II (combat in Europe, seeing a concentration camp), marriage, family life, harsh freelance live.
11. Kirby’s 1960s work were result of him processing the growing up he did as soldier, veteran, husband, artist and father.
12. In late 1940s and 1950s, Kirby became dominant figure in Romance Comics genre, material he later integrated into superheroes
13. Pre-Kirby, the superhero team is just a bunch of characters brought together because it’s cool to do so (Justice Society/Justice League).
14. The Kirby team, by contrast, is defined by a common origin, a shared event, destiny or identity (Fantastic Four, X-Men).
15. The team with a common origin (an outgrowth, I think, of Kirby’s war experience) redefines genre by making it about social change.
16. Team with common experience become a pantheon, often matched against opposing pantheon, creating possibility of epic scope.
17. Finally, critics of early superheroes (McLuhan, Ong, Wertham) called them out for celebrating fascist ideal (Nordic strong-man).
18. Early on, Kirby created his share of übermenschen, but 1960s heroes were opposite: misshapen, freakish, outsiders.
19. Kirby’s revitalization of superhero in 1960s: 1) giving emotional life based on romance comics 2) pantheonic teams, 3) outsider status
19. Kirby’s revitalization of superhero in 1960s: 1) giving emotional life based on romance comics 2) pantheonic teams, 3) outsider status
21. As people meet in San Diego for SDCC, they need to consider that virtually everything around them came out of Kirby.
22. I compared Kirby to Disney earlier, but one crucial difference: financial compensation and credit (h/t @RubenBolling)
23. Kirby’s family is currently appealing their case with Marvel/Disney. The family will most likely lose the appeal.
24. There’s a difference between what is legal and what is morally right. Legally Marvel/Disney own many of Kirby’s creations. Is it right?

"

https://twitter.com/HeerJeet

Lauren Bacall as “Skinny Bones” from Will Eisner’s The Spirit #22 (1950).

Lauren Bacall as “Skinny Bones” from Will Eisner’s The Spirit #22 (1950).