doublenickelsforever:

DOUBLE NICKELS FOREVER
Pre-order starts next week  - $9.95 + $2.00 shipping
A drawn tribute to the Minutemen’s Double Nickels on the Dime album. 58 artists drew the 45 songs on the double LP - 182 pages of drawn econo. Featuring work from:David Espinosa AlvarezDerik BadmanJosh BayerMarc BellBunny BlakeShawn BlissJosef BuchananJim CampbellChris CillaB. Erin ColeWarren CragheadMauricio CorderoRazvan DüFranklin EinspruchShawn EisenachHenry EudySean FordJon-Michael FrankJF FrankelGabrielle GamboaDottie GeorgesTym GodekAllan HaverholmDamon HerdJon HiokiJim HorwatBen HumeniukGiuseppe IacobaciRusty JordanEvan KeelingJeff LangdonDanny MillerHiyori MinatoSimon MoretonL NicholsLes OverlordJohn PorcellinoLuke RamseyInk ReyDmitry SamarovMatt SchmidtAdrian SerghieDerek ShaakBrooke SheridanPete Sickman-GarnerScott StriplingStephen SturgisEd SyderSergio VarbellaChris VorheesJason WalterTodd WebbDean WesterfieldGeoffrey D. WesselAndrew WhiteKelly WilliamsLydia WysockiSarah Boyts YoderDan Zimmerman  
Foreward by Marc Weidenbaum
THANKS!

doublenickelsforever:

DOUBLE NICKELS FOREVER

Pre-order starts next week  - $9.95 + $2.00 shipping

A drawn tribute to the Minutemen’s Double Nickels on the Dime album. 58 artists drew the 45 songs on the double LP - 182 pages of drawn econo. Featuring work from:

David Espinosa Alvarez
Derik Badman
Josh Bayer
Marc Bell
Bunny Blake
Shawn Bliss
Josef Buchanan
Jim Campbell
Chris Cilla
B. Erin Cole
Warren Craghead
Mauricio Cordero
Razvan Dü
Franklin Einspruch
Shawn Eisenach
Henry Eudy
Sean Ford
Jon-Michael Frank
JF Frankel
Gabrielle Gamboa
Dottie Georges
Tym Godek
Allan Haverholm
Damon Herd
Jon Hioki
Jim Horwat
Ben Humeniuk
Giuseppe Iacobaci
Rusty Jordan
Evan Keeling
Jeff Langdon
Danny Miller
Hiyori Minato
Simon Moreton
L Nichols
Les Overlord
John Porcellino
Luke Ramsey
Ink Rey
Dmitry Samarov
Matt Schmidt
Adrian Serghie
Derek Shaak
Brooke Sheridan
Pete Sickman-Garner
Scott Stripling
Stephen Sturgis
Ed Syder
Sergio Varbella
Chris Vorhees
Jason Walter
Todd Webb
Dean Westerfield
Geoffrey D. Wessel
Andrew White
Kelly Williams
Lydia Wysocki
Sarah Boyts Yoder
Dan Zimmerman  

Foreward by Marc Weidenbaum

THANKS!

Tags: punk comics


The Munsters

The Munsters

(Source: bunnyhepburn, via graveyard-smash)

joshbayer:

another drawing request from my website, Yellow Kid Big Baby Team up

mickey baby

joshbayer:

another drawing request from my website, Yellow Kid Big Baby Team up

mickey baby

Back to the Garden: Jesse Jacobs’ Safari Honeymoon

sequentialcanada:

Back to the Garden: Jesse Jacobs’ Safari Honeymoon

By Will WellingtonSafari-Honeymoon_1

Opening Safari Honeymoon, Jesse Jacobs’ new volume with Koyama Press, we fall into a different world, whole and astonishing. An array of strange plants, set in a grid of panels like garden plots, enclose us. Then, lights rise on a scene that could be from a Beckett play: A clearing. A hole. Midday. Finally, the action begins. Enter, from the trap, Monster 1, many-legged with…

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By Will Wellington

Opening Safari HoneymoonJesse Jacobs’ new volume with Koyama Press, we fall into a different world, whole and astonishing. An array of strange plants, set in a grid of panels like garden plots, enclose us. Then, lights rise on a scene that could be from a Beckett play: A clearing. A hole. Midday.Finally, the action begins. Enter, from the trap, Monster 1, many-legged with one wide eye and, on the abdomen, a toothy maw. Monster skitters back and forth, displays chompers, wriggles limbs, prances off. Curtain.

Before a single page is turned, a drama of the most extraordinary subtlety unfolds. This nameless critter says nothing clever and achieves nothing of moment. Yet we watch, entranced. Its humble meandering speaks to us, its simple movements gain monumental importance. It horrifies us, yes. That goes without saying. It disgusts us, scares us, repulses us. Yet it charms us too, beguiles us, endears itself. We lean close, breath bated, drawn, nay, bound to it, deeply involved and hopelessly implicated in its mysterious occupation. It is not, we suspect, a truly monstrous monster. It is innocent. It is even cute. And it receives, in Jacobs’ treatment, our undivided attention, and with it an absurd dignity, an almost-humanity, if only for a page. As this, our first encounter on safari, closes, we long to know more: Who or what is this thing? Where is she or he or it going and why? What does it or he or she mean to communicate by raising its tentacles and writhing so? What does this creature signify?

As we read on, answers present themselves, answers unpleasant, even tragic. Mere pages later, our new companion lies slain, legs curled, hunted by a group of humans on vacation. As one of them, a safari guide, explains, the creature was a mother, the hole a nest crawling with babies that must now be slaughtered to forestall their suffering. The guide’s blunderbuss issues several resounding reports and the deed is done.

On that note, Safari Honeymoon’s plot-proper begins. But even as the humans’ exploits gather us up and propel us onward, the mother monster’s memory remains with us. We wish, perhaps, to return to those early moments when the shadow of death—so chillingly evoked on the cover—did not sprawl hatefully across the page.

Safari-Honeymoon_proof_Page_19-670The plot: two newlyweds—a youngish woman, evidently highly desirable, and her much-older husband—spend their honeymoon on safari. A hazy love triangle materializes between them and their tenacious safari guide as they navigate a toxic jungle populated almost exclusively by snarling monstrosities and insidious parasites. Eventually, an abominable hissing worm burrows into the stalwart guide’s brain during an ill-considered nap and transforms him into a murderous madman with an insatiable appetite and a pair of prehensile eyeballs, forcing the honeymooners to flee and find sustenance on their own in a place bent on destroying them.

To focus too single-mindedly on this procession of events, however, would be to miss the point. Engaging and amusing as the honeymooners’ adventures may be, Safari Honeymoon belongs to the jungle and its inhabitants. In its most captivating passages, seemingly jumbled elements of nature converge to form patterns sensible and profound. Stands of trees merge to form sentient beings that spout gnomic non-sequiturs. Three beasts, two with an eye apiece and one outfitted with a snarling mouth, march in formation to make a face. A thousand tiny bipeds walk in perfect alignment so that they appear, for an instant, to be one creature with a thousand limbs. Jacobs’ breaks such minor actions into exhaustively documented increments. Trading the conventions of naturalism for a geometrical, even mechanical technique, he presides over his panels like a monk over his mandala. The painstaking accumulation of microscopically precise visual elements creates the pulsating symbolic anatomy of the safari and its denizens, the sense that, at any moment, a stunning totality will emerge from the infinite minutia. If only one could retreat to a sufficient distance—if only one were not so small—one could apprehend a grand image, a sign carved in negative space, a vast organizing intelligence, even a deity, as in an exquisite early passage when the point of perspective withdraws to reveal that the tangled foliage through which the honeymooners roam sprouts from the cheeks, nose, and forehead of an enormous, grinning entity. The chaos proves to be controlled. The wild is willed. The newlyweds think they have left the order of civilization for the disordered wilderness, but they instead stumble into an even more complex design.

Compared to the safari’s terse wisdom, in fact, the humans’ dialogue reads like a load of rank gobbledegook, packed with bathos, pompous and vulgar. They sound like the intruders, the marauders, that they are. Jacobs’ style, which catalogues the multi-talented guide’s gourmet delicacies in the same grotesque visual register as the safari’s flora and fauna, ensures that we cannot ignore the monstrous aspect of humanity. The smooth-skinned, leggy, and discerning foodies of Safari Honeymoon appear, from a distance, far more sophisticated and civilized than the squat, doughy, and prodigiously hirsute neanderthals of Jacobs’ previous volume, By This Shall You Know Him. But—especially in a number of hideously unflattering close-ups—Jacobs shows us their true colours.

Happily, Safari Honeymoon’s project is reconciliation, and in the book’s final, rapturous moments—as the honeymooners, stripped of their clothes, are absorbed by the garden they never knew they abandoned—we may finally discard the categories of man and beast. In the end, all is one. As we close the book and look up, the glamour of the jungle still glazing our eyes, only one thing remains to be said: “We are home.”

This is a really great series with great Dan DeCarlo-style art. Collecting records. Collecting comics. Tippy’s Friends Go-go and Animal #8. Artist unknown (Jon D’Agostino?). Tower Comics, March 1968.

This is a really great series with great Dan DeCarlo-style art. Collecting records. Collecting comics. Tippy’s Friends Go-go and Animal #8. Artist unknown (Jon D’Agostino?). Tower Comics, March 1968.

seanhowe:

The Man Who Colored The Marvel Universe:

Stan Goldberg (1932-2014)

Marvel colorist Stan Goldberg, who created the color schemes of the costumes of Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, and dozens of others, died yesterday, at the age of 82. Mark Evanier has more information here.


I wrote briefly, in Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, about two of Stan’s contributions to the Marvel mythos.

On The Fantastic Four:

And although they remained unmasked (in another break from comic-book convention, they were going to keep their identities public), at the urging of letter-writing fans they soon had snappy blue uniforms. “Jack gave them this long underwear with the letter ‘4’ on their chest,” said Stan Goldberg, who designed the color schemes of the Marvel comics. “I made the ‘4’ blue and kept a little area around it white, and then when the villains came in—the villains get the burnt umbers, dark greens, purples, grays, things like that—they can bounce off it.” The blast of colorful heroics against a murky background world immediately set Fantastic Four apart from everything else on the newsstand.

On Spider-Man:

The grand melodrama was offset by Lee’s snappy patter, Ditko’s stunning costume design, and, once again, the primary-color palette choices of Stan Goldberg, who selected for Spider-Man’s costume a combination of cherry red and dark cobalt (in deliberate contrast to the more vivacious azure of the Fantastic Four).

____

Goldberg also drew non-superhero comics for Marvel in its Timely incarnation, and was the longtime artist for Marvel’s Millie the Model series. In the late 1960s he began drawing for various series published by Archie Comics.

cryptofwrestling:

Hot-Chu vending machine card(1970s)

cryptofwrestling:

Hot-Chu vending machine card
(1970s)

noahvansciver:

Sketchbook page.

noahvansciver:

Sketchbook page.

fileformat:

epiphany

(via laurennmcc)

Tags: madon

arecomicsevengood:

Gary Panter, 1978. Taken from this interview.

arecomicsevengood:

Gary Panter, 1978. Taken from this interview.